New Privacy Rule States, Internet Providers Requires Explicit Permission From Customers To Share Their Information

New Privacy Rule States, Internet Providers Requires Explicit Permission From Customers To Share Their Information

Wipe Your Entire Existence Off The Internet In Few Clicks With This Website
Find Out And Delete Data Google Stored About You In Its Server
Tor Phone — Super Private And Secure Version Of Android By Tor Project

Its all about online privacy. One of the major burning topics of present generation. But the new privacy rule soon going to clear some air.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) just passed a new privacy rule that will limit Internet providers to use and sell customer data.

According to new privacy rule — ISPs will have to inform consumers about what information is collected and how it is used and shared, and identify the types of entities with which the ISP shares the data. And most importantly, ISPs will be required to obtain explicit permission from customers— what the commission calls “opt-in consent” — to share the information. And the fact is, the tech giants such as Google, Facebook and Twitter aren’t covered by the new rules.

Also Read : How to make stop Microsoft spying on you — make your Windows 10 as private as possible

According to an FCC fact sheet, that information includes :

  • Precise geolocation (typically the real-world location of a mobile phone or other device)
  • Children’s information
  • Health information
  • Financial information
  • Social Security numbers
  • Web browsing history
  • App usage history
  • The content of communication

ISPs are the gateway to the Internet and collect information about the movies we watch, the websites we visit and, in the case of smartphones, the actual physical locations of where we are. And until now, ISPs typically collect and package to data brokers and marketers without consumers’ knowledge or permission.

Ordinary consumers are unlikely to see an immediate impact from the FCC ruling, but privacy advocates had warned that allowing Internet providers to sell the locations, browsing histories and other online data of their own customers could have taken online tracking to a troubling new level, leaving those who wanted to obscure their online activities — or even their physical movements — few options to protect their privacy.

Also Read : Edward Snowden developed a special phone case to keep us safe from spying eyes

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0